Cornell University
Search:
more options

Info Sci Innovators Present at CSCW 2016

The ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW 2016) bills itself as the conference for presenting research  in the design and use of technologies that affect groups, organizations, communities, and networks. Cornell Info Sci will be well-represented this year, as the following faculty and PhD students will present their research:

• Cornell’s Social Media and ReImagination labs teamed up to interview 25 Cornell students who used Snapchat and found that students enjoyed the freedom to be their true selves on the social media app. Info Sci PhD Bin Xu is the first author on the paper. 

• The team of Info Sci’s Gilly Leshed, Cornell Tech’s Shiri Azenkot, MPS alumna Violeta Voykinska, and Shaomei Wu, PhD ‘11, present results of their research into the Facebook experience among the visually impaired.
 
• PhD Nitesh Goyal and Susan R. Fussell's paper, "Effects of Sensemaking Translucence on Distributed Collaborative Analysis", was not only accepted at CSCW, but it received a Best Paper Honorable Mention Award.

• Authors Gabe Culbertson, Erik L Andersen, Walker M. White, Daniel Zhang, and Malte F Jung present their paper “Crystallize: Simulating Language Immersion through Gameplay”, which details a more immersive approach to learning a foreign language.

• A research team including Info Sci PhDs Brian McInnis, Elizabeth Murnane, Info Sci Professors Dan Cosley and Gilly Leshed, and Dmitry Epstein of the University of Illinois at Chicago offer their paper, “One and Done: Factors affecting one-time contributors to ad-hoc online communities”.

• PhD Dongwook Yoon and IS Professors Steven Jackson and François Guimbretière are among a Cornell and Microsoft Research team that will present “RichReview++: Deployment of a Collaborative Multi-modal Annotation System for Instructor Feedback and Peer Discussion.”

• PhD Samir Passi and IS Associate Professor Phoebe Sengers present their paper, “From What I See, This Makes Sense: Sensing Meaning in Algorithmic Results”, during a CSCW workshop called Algorithms at Work.